July 2015

NMDC newsletter: July 2015
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  NMDC newsletter: July 2015
 
 
 
 
  In this month's edition:  
 
 
  Whitworth is Museum of the Year

£4.89m for RAF Museum centenary programme

New home for ten million objects at National Museum Collections Centre in Edinburgh

I Love Museums campaign up and running

Working Internationally Regional Project (WIRP) - first workshop announced and new online resources

AIM launches best practice document for prospering museums

Hackney Wick: the new capital of Bohemia (and other tourism insights)

Museum of London announces competition to design its new building

Queen’s Birthday Honours

HLF’s ‘first hundred’ measures the impact of major grants

Taking Part Quarter 4 Statistics published

National Survey for Wales: public view of museums and culture

Contemporary Arts Society aims for more women artists on the wall

Export bar for Logie Baird archives

Regional Museums and Galleries Fund open for applications

UK to adopt Hague Convention on Cultural Property

CLA criticises arts-squeezing Ebacc following education speeches

Jerwood Weston scheme offers jobs in the arts to lower income applicants

Plans for the Somme centenary announced
 
 
 
  Section headings:  
 
 
  Members’ news  |  NMDC news  |  Mindmapping good culture  |  Appointments and honours  |  Measuring Culture  |  Events and exhibition offers  |  Shifting worlds: collections in unusual places  |  Women on the walls, and the way up  |  Funding  |  International  |  Cuts  |  Education and the creative economy  |  First World War  |  Tech  |  And finally…  
 
 
  Members’ news  
 
 
 Images this month are courtesy of Museums Sheffield and show pictures from 'A Cultural Legacy - Remembering Frank Constantine' at the Graves Gallery. James Dickson Innes, Mediterranean Coast Scene (Landscape Pyrenees), 1911
Images this month are courtesy of Museums Sheffield and show pictures from 'A Cultural Legacy - Remembering Frank Constantine' at the Graves Gallery. James Dickson Innes, Mediterranean Coast Scene (Landscape Pyrenees), 1911
 
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  Whitworth is Museum of the Year  
 
 
The Whitworth Gallery has become Museum of the Year 2015, winning an £100k prize offered annually by the Art Fund.  The gallery recently reopened after a £15m redevelopment.  Stephen Deuchar for the Art Fund said “we were particularly taken with the relationship between the reconceived building and its surrounding park: museum, locality and community merge as if one.  And in a wider sense the Whitworth has changed the landscape: it truly feels like a museum of the future.”
 
Director Maria Balshaw told the Manchester Evening News that the Gallery intends to spend the money on public facing work “We as a team decided we wouldn’t have a firm plan of what we’d spend a £100k on because it’s a huge sum of money in the current climate.  We thought if we wrote down all the things we wanted to do and then didn’t get the money it would be heartbreaking!  But what we’re all committed to is using that money to continue to expand our reach: so, the work that we’re doing in the park, the work that we’re doing to connect with our local communities.
 
The Whitworth has seen record breaking crowds since it reopened in mid February, receiving 181,000 visitors in 14 weeks, which was more than the gallery previously attracted in a whole year. Art Fund, Manchester Evening News (visitor figures), Whitworth, Manchester Evening News (prize)
 
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  £4.89m for RAF Museum centenary programme  
 
 
The HLF has agreed £4.89m in funding towards the RAF Museum’s centenary programme.  The RAF will be 100 years old in 2018.  The programme includes apprenticeship and volunteering activity to help display more of its 1.2m objects, a STEM learning project, a new exhibition, relandscaping the London site and a new visitor centre.  RAF museum
 
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  British Library partners with Library of Birmingham  
 
 
The British Library has announced a twelve month pilot partnership with the Library of Birmingham.  The collaboration will combine the strengths of each organisation’s collections and expertise.  There will also be funding from the British Library Trust for events around the 400th anniversary of the death of Shakespeare.  British Library
 
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  RAMM welcomes millionth visitor since refit  
 
 
The Royal Albert Memorial Museum in Exeter reached 1 million visitors since its refit in 2011 on 29th June.  Staff surprised student Polly Hill who ‘just came in for a little wander round’ with a special behind the scenes tour of the museum.  RAMM
 
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  NMDC members included in lottery Good Causes vote  
 
 
The National Lottery is holding a televised Awards ceremony to celebrate some of the best projects funded by the Lottery, and is inviting the public to vote.  One of the seven categories is Heritage, and two NMDC members are on the shortlist: The Science Museum for its new permanent Information Age gallery and the RAF Museum’s First World War in the Air gallery.  Other projects in the finals include the restoration of Lincoln Castle, and Mind the Gap, an apprenticeship scheme based around railway heritage.  The vote runs until 29th July, and winners will receive £2k.   Lottery Good Causes
 
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  New home for ten million objects at National Museum Collections Centre in Edinburgh  
 
 
The new National Museums Collection Centre has been opened in Edinburgh by Culture Secretary Fiona Hyslop.  The three storey building will house ten million objects from National Museum Scotland’s collections.  The oldest object is a 4.5 billion year old meteorite, and the collections range in size from a millimetre long Nephanes Titan beetle to a 5.2m sperm whale skull.  Chair of NMS Trustees, Bruce Minto said, “it is extremely important that the collections which are not on public display but which have enormous significance, particularly to researchers across a huge range of disciplines and countries, are kept in such a way that assures their good condition in perpetuity and which is properly organised and accessible.  This new building is an important step on the way to achieving that goal for all of the national collections.”  NMS
 
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  Name change for CyMAL  
 
 
The Welsh cultural service formerly known as ‘CyMAL: Museums Archives and Libraries Wales’ has changed its name to ‘Museums Archives and Libraries Division’.  Its work remains the same.
 
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  NMDC news  
 
 
  I Love Museums campaign up and running  
 
 
NMDC has launched the I Love Museums campaign to encourage members of the public and the museum profession to voice their reasons for using, enjoying and loving museums.  A dedicated website includes downloadable posters and other resources, and a twibbon is available for use on Twitter.  So far over 1,400 people have signed up to the campaign call for local and national government funding and support for museums.  Museums are encouraged to promote the campaign to their own audiences in order to help make museum supporters more visible and connected with each other and to demonstrate the public support for museums in financially challenging times.  NMDC, ILoveMuseums, ACE
 
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  Working Internationally Regional Project (WIRP) - first workshop announced and new online resources  
 
 
Booking is now open for the WIRP Workshop on International Touring Exhibitions & Loans, which will take place at M Shed in Bristol on 22nd September 2015.  The workshop costs £35, or £25 for small museums with less than 20,000 visitors per year.  The aim of the workshop is to enhance the confidence and skills of participants, and provide information and practical advice on international touring and loans.  Relevant case studies will be presented alongside facilitated group work.  Places are limited so early booking is recommended.  Book here

This is the first in a series of thematic one-day workshops that will take place between September and January until 2017.  Other confirmed topics include 'Working with China', 'Working with India', 'Working with South East Europe & the Balkans' and 'Working with the Middle East'.  Full programme details and dates will be announced shortly on the ICOM UK website.  Sign up to receive the latest news and updates at ICOM

Related resources are freely accessible on the ICOM UK website Let us know what you think, or if you have ideas for future content.  Contact Dana Andrew, Project Co-ordinator, dana@cuello-andrew.co.uk  ICOM (resources)
 
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  Mindmapping good culture  
 
 
  AIM launches best practice document for prospering museums  
 
 
AIM has published a succinct two page document ‘The Hallmarks of Prospering Museums’ which charts what works to create a successful organisation, regardless of size.  It is based on the successes of AIM museums and provides a checklist of issues including purpose, finance, collections, leadership and culture, governance, visitor focus, innovation and risk, awareness and networks.  The publication is just a beginning of longer term work in the area, and AIM is keen to hear responses to the document, and suggestions for case studies.  Please contact sassy@aim-museums.co.uk  if you would like to comment.  AIM
 
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  Hackney Wick: the new capital of Bohemia (and other tourism insights)  
 
 
The Guardian has published a summary of insights provided by the London Cultural Tourism workshop, held at City Hall in June.  A recurring theme is that although London attracts millions of tourists, most are visiting the same central London top attractions, leaving much of the city unexplored.  Last year 90% of visits were to the top 20 venues.  James McClure of AirBnB pointed out that the maps provided by most smart London hotels don’t extend beyond Brick Lane.  However, technology is transforming how people are interacting with the city – from YPlan and Instagram to the dating app Tinder.  There is a strong interest among some tourists in experiencing local life as well as major tourist destinations.  Anna Maloney of Hackney WickED revealed that Hackney Wick has a higher concentration of artists per square mile than anywhere else in the world – and her organisation is helping local artists to make a living from new ways of accessing cultural content.  Guardian
 
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  Museum of London announces competition to design its new building  
 
 
The Museum of London is offering a prize for a design for its new building at Smithfield Market.  £200k has been provided by the Greater London Authority to fund a prize and develop a procurement and management plan.  The Museum hopes the new building will be in use by 2021.  Museums Journal, Building Design, ALVA
 
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  Appointments and honours  
 
 
  Queen’s Birthday Honours  
 
 
Several museum staff have received Queen’s Birthday Honours.  These include a knighthood for National Gallery Director Nicholas Penny and a CBE for Maria Balshaw, Director of the Whitworth Gallery.
 
Simon Wallis, Director of The Hepworth Wakefield and Perdita Hunt, Director of Watts Gallery receive OBEs.  Arts Industry (subscription only), Arts Professional
 
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  Appointments  
 
 
Jesse Norman has been appointed Chair of the Select Committee for Culture, Media and Sport Committee replacing John Whittingdale, the new Minister for Culture.  Norman is the Conservative MP for Hereford and South Herefordshire.  He has previously spoken in favour of redistributing arts funding to the regions.   Arts Industry (subscription only), Arts Professional, Parliament (Norman biography)
 
British Library Chief Executive Roly Keating has been elected President of the Conference of European National Libraries for a period of three years.  The body has 49 members in 46 European countries.  British Library
 
AIM has appointed a new Assistant Director, Helen Wilkinson.  She previously led the MA’s policy work and has been a consultant.  Museums + Heritage
 
Ken Gosling has been appointed as new CEO of the Collections Trust.  He was previously Director of Communications at the Britten-Pears Foundation.  He will take up the post in mid September.  Collections Trust
 
Emmie Kell has been appointed as Chief Executive of the Cornwall Museum Partnership.  She has extensive museum and local government experience, and has worked as a consultant in Cornwall for the past eight years.  SWFed
 
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  National Museum Wales seeks trustees and Vice President  
 
 
‘Could you help care for dinosaurs, Impressionist masterpieces and a coal mine?’ asks National Museum Wales as it seeks five trustees and a new Vice President.  The roles are voluntary and will take up a minimum of twelve days per year, or one day a week for the Vice President post.  Ken Skates, Deputy Minister for Culture, Sport and Tourism said the museum was seeking a ‘diverse and ambitious board which reflects the diversity of modern Wales’.  Welsh Government
 
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  Measuring Culture  
 
 
  HLF’s ‘first hundred’ measures the impact of major grants  
 
 
The HLF has made grants of over £5m to 173 organisations over its lifetime, and the first 100 of these projects are now complete.  HLF has published an overview of the impact of this investment.  Findings include:
 
  • 94 million visits are made as a result of these grants – a 130% rise on previous attendance, with families and young people making up the greatest part of the increase
  • The funding created 2,536 new jobs within 46 of the funded organisations
  • 49 organisations extended their work with schools, and 58 new education spaces have been created as a result of the grant
  • Among the recipients were seven of the ten most popular visitor attractions in England: the British Museum, National Gallery, Southbank Centre, Natural History Museum, Science Museum, the V&A and Somerset House.  HLF also funded four of the five top attractions in Scotland: National Museum Scotland, Scottish National Gallery, Kelvingrove and the Riverside Museum. 
 
HLF also invites people to experience the impact of its grant making visually through the First 100 Flickr Gallery.  HLF Chief Executive, Carole Souter, said, “thanks to National Lottery players, over £1.6bn of HLF money has been invested in truly life-changing major projects.  We've seen the transformation of the Mary Rose Museum, the creation of a new building at Imperial War Museum Duxford and the reinvention of other great heritage favourites such as Stonehenge, ss Great Britain and Bletchley Park.  What makes these projects stand out is a strong vision, robust leadership and an ability to successfully navigate organisational change." The HLF has also performed some important saves: former head of Glasgow Museums, Mark O’Neill says that the Kelvingrove Museum would have closed ‘within two years’ without vital support from the fund.  HLF, Museums Journal, The Art Newspaper (subscription only)
 
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  Thatcher archive accepted in lieu  
 
 
Arts Council England has announced that papers belonging to the archive of Baroness Thatcher, who died in 2013, have been accepted in lieu of £1,013,250 in inheritance tax.  They will become part of the Churchill Archives Centre at Churchill College, University of Cambridge.  The archives will be open to the public, and include a 17,000 word account of the Falklands conflict written by Thatcher in the year after the war.  Drafts of key speeches and memoirs of other key political events are also included. Cambridge University, Telegraph
 
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  Taking Part Quarter 4 Statistics published  
 
 
DCMS has published adult statistics for cultural participation covering the period April 2014  - March 2015.  Findings include:
 
  • In 2014/15, 52% said they had visited a museum or gallery in the last year.  Though a similar proportion to 2013/14 and 2012/13, this was significantly higher than in any survey year between 2005/06 and 2011/12.
  • Visits vary by region: 57.9% of those in the South East had visited a museum in the previous 12 months, London 56.4% - but in the West Midlands 44.2% visited.  54.4% visited in the North West. 
  • 60% of those from the upper socio-economic group visited museums, compared to 38.9% from the lower socio-economic group.  Prosperous urbanites were the most likely to visit a museum with 63.9% attending.
  • Religion also has a statistically significant effect, with 55% with no religion attending, 51.3% of Christians, and 42.2% of other religions.
  • 73% had visited a heritage site in the previous twelve months, a figure that has been roughly the same since 2011/12
  • 34% had visited a library in the previous year, similar to 2013/14, but down from 48% in 2005/6
 
DCMS has launched a new twitter channel for departmental statistics at @DCMSInsight.  Gov.uk (full data), Taking Part (summary email)
 
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  National Survey for Wales: public view of museums and culture  
 
 
The Welsh Government has released the first set of statistics from the National Survey for Wales, which is based on interviews with 14,000 people.  Initial findings about arts, museums and heritage include:
 
  • 58% of people had been to an arts event in the last 12months, 59% had visited an historic place, and 39% had been to a museum.  (The figure for museums is 13% lower than the Taking Part average for England)
  • 97% of people were satisfied with the arts and historic place they visited, and 96% were satisfied with the museum they visited
 
Wales.gov (full statistical release), Wales.gov (headlines)
 
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  Employment rises again in the creative economy  
 
 
The Government has published statistics showing that the number of people employed directly or indirectly in the creative economy continued to rise markedly in 2014.  Findings include:
 
  • Total employment in the Creative Economy rose by 5% between 2013 and 2014 – a rise of 2.6m to 2.8m jobs.  Since 2011 the number of jobs has increased by 13.7%.
  • By contrast there was only a 2.1% increase in jobs in the wider economy in the same period
  • One in six jobs is London is in the Creative Economy compared to one in 18 in the North East
  • 58.8% of people in the sector had at least a first degree, compared to 31.8% of all UK jobs.
  • 91.9% of jobs in the sector went to people in more advantaged socio-economic groups, compared to 66% of jobs in the wider economy.
 
Meanwhile a report from the UK Commission for Employment and Skills says 1.2m more people will be needed in the digital and creative sector by 2022.  Gov.uk (full statistics), Gov.uk (overview), The Stage
 
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  Events and exhibition offers  
 
 
David Hepher No. 21, 1971. c The Artist Courtesy Flowers Gallery, London and New York
David Hepher No. 21, 1971. c The Artist Courtesy Flowers Gallery, London and New York
 
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  Collections Trust Annual Conference  
 
 
The Collections Trust Annual Conference takes place at the Natural History Museum on 22nd September.  It will be structured around SPECTRUM standards, and the full programme will be announced shortly.  Ticket prices start at £125 for individuals and small museums to £250 for businesses.  Collections Trust
 
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  Digital Destinations archives conference  
 
 
The National Archives and Research Libraries UK are running a joint conference, Discovering Collections, Discovering Communities: Exploring new digital destinations for heritage and academia.  More than seventy speakers will be present including Chris Michaels, Head of Digital and Publishing at the British Museum and Simon Chaplin, Director of Culture and Society at the Wellcome Trust.  The conference takes place at The Lowry in Salford on 12th – 14th October and is free, with an optional charge of £30 for the two evening events.  Research Libraries UK, RLUK (registration)
 
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  Taking Part user event  
 
 
An event to celebrate ten years of the cultural statistical collection programme, Taking Part, will be held on 28th July at DCMS.  It will include presentations describing how the survey has been used, as well as looking at the options for the future of Taking Part.  Email TakingPart@culture.gov.uk for more information or to book a free place.
 
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  No Boundaries announces international speakers  
 
 
Arts Council England and the British Council have announced speakers for No Boundaries on 29th and 30th September,  described as the ‘arts and culture industry’s annual conference’.   Speakers from Salt, Istanbul, Action for Hope, Cairo, Belarus Free Theatre, Children’s BBC, Aardman Animations and the International Festival of Ideas in the US will bring a unique international perspective to the conference.   Two day tickets range from £60 - £250.   No Boundaries
 
Also: Culture24 has published the PR deadlines for the October Museums at Night event.  The first deadline to register events is 17th July.  Museums at Night
 
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  Bids open to host Tower of London poppy sculptures for UK tour  
 
 
Two parts of the original Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red installation, which attracted millions of visitors during its time at the Tower of London, will be displayed at locations across the UK in 2015 and 2016.  The 14 – 18 NOW project is seeking bids from venues who will be able to show the sculptures for free, have enough space, and which are doing other work which resonates with the First World War. Interested museums should contact poppies@1418now.org.uk
 
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  What’s it worth?  The value and potential of the Collaborative Doctoral Award  
 
 
The AHRC is holding an event to examine and celebrate ten years of the Collaborative Doctoral Award, which brings together heritage and academia support for PhD students.  They are keen to attract staff and students involved in similar activities, or considering the policy issues surrounding research funding and cultural heritage across the UK.  It takes place at the British Museum on 27th July from 10 – 5.30pm.  Tickets are free.  Eventbrite
 
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  Arts fundraising courses  
 
 
A number of arts fundraising courses are running between now and April 2016, oriented towards museums.  Subjects for the one day courses include networking and making the ask, digital strategy, using data and writing applications.   Courses are £95 + VAT, or £350 + VAT for all five.  Arts Fundraising
 
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  On the move: mobile learning in museums and galleries  
 
 
The V&A is hosting a day long event on mobile and digital learning in galleries.  Speakers include Kati Price, Head of Digital Learning at the V&A, who will be offering a preview of the Museum’s new Europe Galleries and Hugh Wallace, Head of Digital at National Museums Scotland, discussing the participatory app ‘Capturing the Museum’.  Jon Little will also be discussing iBeacon technology at Kew Gardens.   The event takes place on 30th July from 10.30 and costs £95.  Digital Learning Network
 
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  Shifting worlds: collections in unusual places  
 
 
  Modern art riffs with Victorian industry at Ironbridge Gorge  
 
 
Meadow Arts are working with Ironbridge Gorge on the Shifting Worlds exhibition, which will place contemporary art in the Gorge.  There will also be a series of events in the autumn and winter of 2015.  Faye Claridge, who produces art based on archival material, will be artist in residence throughout the period.  Meadowarts
 
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  Collections meet commerce: museum objects in Chester shops  
 
 
The City of Chester has launched a new project, Chester Unlocked, in which objects from local museum collections are being displayed in 30 local shops.  Chester attracts a large number of tourists, but businesses have suffered in recent years from online competition and the effects of recession.  The project aims to increase footfall in shops, while also teaching visitors about local heritage.  Tourists are given a collections map, so they can track down the objects across the city.  Chester Unlocked runs until November, but may be extended if successful.  BBC
 
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  Murder in the Cathedral (and other public spirited acts)  
 
 
An alliance of private art collectors, Sheffield Cathedral, Museums Sheffield and other art venues is behind a contemporary art festival which will take place across Sheffield during the autumn.  It includes placing Jake and Dinos Chapman’s gory, blood dripping artwork ‘Cyber Iconic Man’ in Sheffield Cathedral.  The Dean, Peter Bradley, said he had rejected earlier suggestions as too tame: “of course there are many images of violence in the cathedral already, crucifixes and so forth, that we are desensitised to, and we are hoping the piece will lead to a debate around violence and religion and martyrdom.”
 
Meanwhile Director of Museums Sheffield, Kim Streets, reflected in the Guardian that direct relationships between art collecting philanthropists and cities might be the future in a landscape of shrinking public investment.  She said, “I imagine a future where the public funding disappears, perhaps in 10 years time.  The idea here is that philanthropists can play a role in developing public art galleries in the future and I think that’s very important for regional institutions in particular.  We all need to develop a vision of what public arts will be like in 20 or 30 years time.”  A summit on the effect of private philanthropy on the arts will take place during the festival.  Guardian
 
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  Richard III ‘worth £60m’ to Leicester  
 
 
Leicester City Council says that the discovery of Richard III in a city car park has been worth £60m to the city, according to independent research.  Around 1,000 jobs have also been indirectly created.  City Mayor, Peter Soulsby, said, “there is no doubt that we are welcoming more visitors to the city than ever before, and judging by the increased number of visits to our museums and heritage sites they are finding out about the rest of our rich history and not just Richard lll.”  Leicester City Council
 
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  Women on the walls, and the way up  
 
 
  Contemporary Arts Society aims for more women artists on the wall  
 
 
The Contemporary Arts Society (CAS) is working with the philanthropist Valeria Napoleone to offer art galleries the opportunity to own more art by women.  Each year they will purchase and donate an artwork by a living woman artist.  CAS will be asking for expressions of interest for the first round of the scheme in April 2016, with the first artwork being delivered a year later.  Director of CAS, Caroline Douglas, said, “museum collections necessarily reflect historical gender imbalances and the 20th and 21st centuries have seen many more female artists achieving international recognition.  But there is still work to do.  In joining forces with Valeria Napoleone we have a unique opportunity to proactively help our Museum Members build collections that accurately reflect the diversity of great work being produced by living artists.”  Museums Journal, Contemporary Arts Society
 
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  Business support in libraries encourages more diverse entrepreneurs  
 
 
The British Library’s ‘Enterprising Libraries’ project has been supporting people to become entrepreneurs through services in their local branch.  A two year review of the project found that as a result women are becoming entrepreneurs through the scheme at far more than the national rate.  Of 1,700 businesses, 47% were led by women, compared with an 18% UK average.  27% were from BME groups compared to 7% nationally.  Kanya King MBE, an ambassador for the British Library’s IP scheme said, “the great thing about libraries is that they are open and accessible to everyone and, as such, I’m not surprised that these Enterprising Libraries have succeeded in attracting such a diverse audience in to use their services. There is so much untapped creative talent among women and ethnic minorities and I’m delighted to see these libraries helping them to turn their ideas into successful businesses.”  British Library
 
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  Tower Hamlets Council hopes to keep ‘Old Flo’  
 
 
A controversy about the ownership and future of a Henry Moore statue which has lasted for more than two years may be approaching a positive conclusion.  In 2012 the Lonodn Borough of Tower Hamlets planned to sell Draped Seated Woman – known locally as Old Flo to raise money towards its £100m budget shortfall.  Ownership was contested by Bromley Council, and the high court has yet to rule on ownership.  However, the London Borough of Tower Hamlets now says it would not sell the statue, but instead use it as part of a cultural renewal strategy.   During the controversy the Museum of London had offered to display Old Flo at the Museum of Docklands.  Director Sharon Ament said, “The Judge still has to decide on ownership between the two boroughs, but it’s a huge relief that one of Moore’s most important works has been saved.”  Museums Journal
 
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  Women leaders in museums, galleries and heritage  
 
 
Tate Modern has hosted a meeting of 100 women leaders in the museum and heritage sectors to share their experience and vision.  The programme is part of the Confidence - Choice - Connections programme, which holds events across the UK to encourage more women to realise their potential as leaders.  Speakers included Sue Owen, Permanent Secretary at DCMS who described how the programme has helped her own journey.   The programme is a collaboration between DCMS, NMDC, ACE and the Women Leaders in Museums Network.  Chair of NMDC Diane Lees said "having been involved with WLMN from its inception, I have witnessed how valuable both the WLMN, and other networks, have been, both for the sector as a whole and in supporting individuals during a time of unprecedented change. It is a joy to see this benefit broadening its reach to inspire more women to achieve their potential."  The networks are all keen to welcome new members as the groups develop and spaces are created so keep a look out for opportunities near to you, or contact ajay.srivastava@rafmuseum.org for more details.
 
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  Theft from Leicester museum  
 
 
A print by the German expressionist artist Käthe Kollwitz was stolen from the New Walk Museum and Art Gallery in Leicester on 29th May.  It is entitled Self-portrait 1920 and has been valued at around £3.5k.  Kollwitz’s work reflects the effects of war, loss and the lives of working class people.  Police are now examining CCTV to try to identify the thief.   Museums Journal
 
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  Cézanne painting likely to leave the Fitzwilliam  
 
 
Ed Vaizey has placed an export bar on Cézanne’s Vue sur L’Estaque et le Château d’If, which was sold earlier this year to a foreign buyer for £13.5m.  The bar will be in place until 21st December, with a possible extension to the following June.  The painting belonged to Samuel Courtald’s family and had been on display at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge since 1985.  Fitzwilliam Director Tim Knox said, “We have been very grateful for the chance to display this beautiful picture for so many years alongside our fine collection of impressionists, but at £13.5m it is unlikely that the Fitzwilliam Museum would be able to match this sum to prevent its export.”  Museums Journal
 
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  Export bar for Logie Baird archives  
 
 
Culture Minister Ed Vaizey has placed an export bar on archives of early television, which describe experiments by John Logie Baird and his assistant to create transatlantic broadcasts during 1926/7.  The bar will be in place until 28th September, to see if the £78.75k asking price can be matched.  It is possible the period will be extended to 28th December.  Christopher Roswell of the Reviewing Committee said, “the Columbia disc and the notes connected with this world first of a transantlantic video recording represents British ingenuity and invention at the highest level.  The notes contain the first ever use of the acronym ‘TV’ for television.  The excitement of the achievement rests in these objects, which we hope will remain in this country as a permanent testament to Logie Baird and his team.  Their departure abroad would also be a serious loss to scholarship.”  Gov.uk
 
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  Tate Modern allows climate activists to pull an all-nighter  
 
 
Climate activists have again protested at Tate Modern, this time occupying the Turbine Hall and writing passages from climate change related text on the floor in charcoal during a 25 hour marathon over a weekend in mid June.  The gallery asked them to leave at closing time, but eventually allowed them to remain overnight.  Blouinartinfo, Guardian
 
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  Funding  
 
 
John Armstrong (1893-1973), Nocturne, 1947. Collection Museums Sheffield, UK  Photo c. Museums Sheffield and Bridgeman Images
John Armstrong (1893-1973), Nocturne, 1947. Collection Museums Sheffield, UK Photo c. Museums Sheffield and Bridgeman Images
 
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  Regional Museums and Galleries Fund open for applications  
 
 
The Regional Museums and Galleries Fund has announced a budget of £482k for 2015/16 from which it expects to make four two to three year grants to regional museums and galleries.  The fund particularly focuses on enhancing and sustaining curatorial development to attract a broader public for museums with collections around visual and decorative arts, and social and natural history.  The closing date is 9th October.  John Ellerman Foundation
 
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  Extended Deadline for Europa Nostra Seven Most Endangered  
 
 
Europa Nostra’s Seven Most Endangered programme locates the most at risk buildings and monuments in Europe, and then mobilises private, public and international support to protect them.  The nominations for the 2016 scheme have been extended until 31st July 2015.  Europa Nostra
 
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  International  
 
 
  ‘Fit for China’ showcasing project  
 
 
The British Council, Culture24 and the consultants Storythings are offering a new opportunity for museums to reach Chinese audiences with their online assets.  The Fit for China digital showcasing project will teach participants how to reach Chinese audiences, and work with other UK museums to share good practice.  The deadline for expressions of interest is 5pm on 20th July 2015.  Successful applicants will hear by 1st September.  Culture24
 
Also:  Following a partnership with Belgium to make UK visas easier to obtain for Chinese visitors, tourism bodies are hoping that the number of visits will rise.  In 2014 there was a 17% drop in the number of Chinese business travellers to the UK compared to the previous year.  Museums Journal
 
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  UK to adopt Hague Convention on Cultural Property  
 
 
The new Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, John Whittingdale, has announced that the UK will now move to ratify the 1954 Hague Convention on the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict. This move has cross-party support but has been on hold since 2004 due to lack of parliamentary time.  Whittingdale said, "while the UK's priority will continue to be the human cost of these conflicts, I am in no doubt we must also do what we can to prevent any further cultural destruction.  The loss of a country's heritage threatens its very identity." The news was welcomed by campaigner Professor Peter Stone as "fantastic news... as long as there are no further delays", while the Earl of Clancarty pressed for a date in question to the House of Lords.  Chief Executive of the British Council Ciarán Devane said that legislation would allow the Council to “extend the work we already do” to preserve cultural heritage.  Meanwhile Dan Cruikshank’s in depth look at the issues ‘Civilisation Under Attack’ is available on BBC iplayer for another three weeks.   In early July there were reports of the destruction of ancient monuments at Palmyra.  An investigation by the Guardian and UCL antiquities expert Mark Altaweel suggests that looted antiquities from Syria and Iraq are finding their way to London antiques shops.  Apollo, BBC, Guardian, BBC iplayer, Guardian
 
Also: The Bamiyan Buddhas, the colossal 6th century statues destroyed by the Taliban in 2001 have been temporarily recreated as giant projections, exactly fitting the alcove where they once stood.  Meanwhile, Project Mosul is replacing IS-destroyed objects using 3D printing.  Hyperallergic
 
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  Cuts  
 
 
  Highland Council revisits budget cuts for museums  
 
 
Faced with a budget shortfall of £46m, the Highland Council is again exploring cuts to museums and libraries.  Finance Committee Chairman Bill Fernie said "We will be revisiting some of the potential budget savings that were rejected by the past administration and High Life Highland will be among them.  They were very good at finding the savings we asked them to find last time around but sorry, we just have to look at everything."  Last year the Council stopped short of a £865m cut to High Life Highland, after its Chief Executive Ian Murray said it could lead to the closure of Inverness Museum and Art Gallery.  Arts Industry (subscription only),  Ross-Shire Journal
 
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  Bazalgette reacts to £1.2m ACE funding cut as ‘good news’  
 
 
National museums sponsored by DCMS and Arts Council England will be receiving an in-year budget cut of 0.35% in 2015/16. This is part of £30m of savings DCMS were asked to make as a result of the Chancellor's In-Year Budget Review Process announced in June.  A spokeswoman for Arts Council England said,  “although all cuts are damaging, we can be reassured that this 0.35% reduction is a relatively small amount and won’t impact on our 2015/16 grants to national portfolio organisations and major partner museums.”  Arts Council England Chair Peter Bazalgette tweeted that the reduction was “good news for arts and culture for this year at least” in comparison with cuts elsewhere.  Arts Industry (subscription only), The Stage
 
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  Politicians should be more forthright about supporting the arts, says Peter Bazalgette  
 
 
Speaking at the Soho Create Festival, Arts Council England Chair, Peter Bazalgette, criticised politicians who avoid praising the arts because they believe it isn’t a vote winner.  “[There is] still quite a strong idea in the House of Commons that you get votes by saying you’re a football fan but not by saying you’re a theatre fan.  Actually more people attend arts and cultural events than go to the football... It’s the faux man or woman of the people act which is just pathetic.  I think it is lessening but it’s still there.” He also criticised the use of arts as a ‘brilliant ambassadorial thing’ abroad, while failing to support the sector at home.  The Stage
 
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  Senior management leave as the Hepworth undergoes major reorganisation  
 
 
A major reorganisation at the Hepworth Wakefield has led to the departure of its senior management team with the exception of the Director.  The Gallery is run as a charitable trust employing 72 staff.  A spokeswoman said the restructure was part of a plan “to increase footfall, increase income and maximise our resources and their impact.”  Museums Journal
 
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  Charity tax relief on direct mail to be challenged by HMRC  
 
 
The print and distribution of mail packs for charities by specialist companies has been zero VAT for many years.  From 1st August HMRC will be withdrawing this benefit.  Philanthropy Impact says the costs may run to millions, and many charities have not factored in the impact of these increased costs.  Philanthropy Impact
 
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  Education and the creative economy  
 
 
Harry Frank Constantine, A Winter Garden (Brocco Bank), 1953 c. The Artists Estate
Harry Frank Constantine, A Winter Garden (Brocco Bank), 1953 c. The Artists Estate
 
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  CLA criticises arts-squeezing Ebacc following education speeches  
 
 
Education Secretary Nicky Morgan and Nick Gibb, Minister of State for Schools, have both given speeches emphasising government commitment to the Ebacc.  Schools cannot be graded ‘outstanding’ if Ebacc subjects are not studied at GCSE.  Morgan said “there doesn’t need to be a false choice between an academic or an arts-based curriculum. You can do them both and you can do them both well.”  However, the Cultural Learning Alliance says that it will be difficult for schools to do both, with arts being shifted to extra-curricular timetabling.  They say the Ebacc requirement is ‘too rigid’ for all children, and that simply adding arts to the Ebacc curriculum will not work because timetables are already overstretched.   They point to comment from educators across the political spectrum of the media, and ask teachers to get in touch with the CLA with examples of how the Ebacc is affecting their work.  The Incorporated Society of Musicians, whose previous campaigning for a broader Ebacc attracted 46,000 supporters said it would also be stepping up campaigning.  CLA, Arts Professional
 
Also:  A new report argues that the creative sector is being held back by a lack of digital skills.  The UK Commission for Employment and Skills says that there is a need for workers who combine creativity with adeptness in social media, cloud computing, entrepreneurialism and technical skills. Arts Professional, Employment and Skills (full report)
 
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  Paul Hamlyn Foundation plans increases to funding for arts education  
 
 
The Paul Hamlyn Foundation has published its strategic plan to 2021.  It includes strong support for arts education in schools.  The Foundation says, “for many young people, particularly those experiencing the most disadvantage, the only opportunity to gain access to arts education is at school.”  It adds that there is a strong appetite for collaboration between schools and arts bodies. Arts Professional, Paul Hamlyn Foundation
 
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  Scotland makes plans to grow the creative economy  
 
 
Scotland’s new Creative Skills Investment Plan has been announced, which looks for ways of expanding the Scottish creative economy and forging strong links with education.  It aims to tackle the skills gaps in the sector, improving diversity and better preparing the future workforce.  Graduates in creative disciplines will be offered management skills courses, creative leaders in subjects from digital to performing arts will be offered development programmes, and an apprenticeships scheme will be developed.  The emphasis will be on developing a highly practical skill set.   Arts Professional
 
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  Jerwood Weston scheme offers jobs in the arts to lower income applicants  
 
 
Four arts charities have joined forces to offer first jobs in the arts to young people from lower income backgrounds.  The scheme offers £430k in funding, supported by the Jerwood Charitable Foundation, Garfield Weston Foundation, Andrew Lloyd Webber Foundation and J Paul Getty Jnr Charitable Trust.
 
The Weston Jerwood Creative Bursaries programme is working with dozens of organisations across artforms and geography, including the Lowry, Turner Contemporary, Hepworth Wakefield and Kettles Yard in Cambridge.  The scheme follows a successful pilot in 2010 – 12.  Jobs under the scheme will be advertised on the websites of participating organisations, but also be summarised on the Jerwood Charitable Foundation site.   Jerwood Charitable Foundation, Arts Industry (subscription only)
 
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  First World War  
 
 
  Plans for the Somme centenary announced  
 
 
Plans have been announced for the next major commemoration of the First World War – remembrance of the Battle of the Somme in 2016.  The Government will be offering 8,000 tickets to a major public event at Thiepval in Northern France on 1st July 2016, which will be distributed by lottery.  
 
Meanwhile, writing for HLF, Professor Mark Connelly of the University of Kent explains the significance of the battle, which killed more than a million people, and the effect of the footage from the battle on cinema audiences in the months that followed.  Gov.uk, HLF (overview of the Somme)
 
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  Popularity leads to further £4m for FWW commemoration  
 
 
HLF is making a further £4m available for community projects to commemorate the First World War, following huge interest in the original fund.  Grants from £3k - £10k will be awarded.  HLF Chair Sir Peter Luff, said, “the demand for National Lottery funding for First World War projects has been phenomenal, so much so we’ve decided to make extra money available.  This will mean in particular that more young people can explore the momentous events of a war that shaped our nation, Europe and the world.”  HLF
 
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  Tech  
 
 
  VanGoing for growth  
 
 
The VanGo Yourself online game, which invites users to upload pictures of themselves recreating famous artworks, is seeking to expand through crowdfunding.  The project is looking for between €5k – 12k within the next month, and is experimentally discovering whether users will invest in cultural digital development.  Organisers Culture24 are also seeking more museums and galleries who would like to participate and see their open licence images VanGo-ed.  Contact Rosie@Culture24.org.uk Goteo
 
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  And finally…  
 
 
What was it like to be a tourist in Wales in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries?  A new website, Sublime Wales, charts the experiences of early tourists from 1700 onwards, drawing from 1,200 surviving accounts.  Relationships between tourists and locals were not always positive: a document from 1806 describes tour guides from Holyhead as ‘mostly a set of drunken fellows’ before going on to, conversely, describe the dim view Welsh people took of the English:
 
“A few years ago a Welsh peasant would hardly acknowledge an Englishman to be of a real human species, but would rather be inclined to think of him of a mixed nature between man and some other fierce two-footed animal: indeed, the Country people in Wales have in general to this day but an unfavourable opinion of the English; as too many of those who come and settle themselves here, behave in a manner more like heathens who have no God in the world than as men and Christians.” Sublime Wales
 
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